THEORY OF EVOLUTION BOOK

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jibticutepo.ml: The Theory of Evolution (Canto) (): John Maynard Smith: Books. jibticutepo.ml: Charles Darwin and the Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection Discoveries of Scientific Pioneers) (): Fred Bortz PH.D.: Books. On the Origin of Species published on 24 November , is a work of scientific literature by Charles Darwin which is considered to be the foundation of evolutionary biology. Darwin's book introduced the scientific theory that populations evolve over Darwin's theory of evolution is based on key facts and the inferences drawn.


Theory Of Evolution Book

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The Theory of Evolution book. Read 4 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. A century ago Darwin and Wallace explained how evolution cou. Most of them said they don't read popular books on evolution, which I found kind of . the degree of religiosity and the acceptance of the theory of evolution. The theory of evolution by natural selection, first formulated in Darwin's book "On the Origin of Species" in , is the process by which.

Return to Book Page. A century ago Darwin and Wallace explained how evolution could have happened in terms of processes known to take place today. This book describes how their theory has been confirmed, but at the same time transformed, by recent research.

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Natural selection

Published August 31st by Cambridge University Press first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions 3. Friend Reviews.

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What is Darwin's Theory of Evolution?

Be the first to ask a question about The Theory of Evolution. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Jul 31, Emelia rated it really liked it. Overall, I enjoyed reading this book. I felt at times that I was lost to the point of the science being explained, but that could of been that there was no point, simply John Maynard Smith was enlightening me to something. In the end though, this is a good book to get a comprehensive view of evolution and it's mechanics.

Even if you are not into science and skip over the harder parts, you'll eventually be left with a nice understanding of evolution, genetics, speciation and the point of the most Overall, I enjoyed reading this book. Even if you are not into science and skip over the harder parts, you'll eventually be left with a nice understanding of evolution, genetics, speciation and the point of the most interesting discussion towards the end, the difference between evolutionary development and historical.

Makes you think. Feb 16, Xander rated it it was ok.

I decided to pick up and read John Maynard Smith's The Theory of Evolution to deepen my understanding of evultionary biology. My primary knowledge comes mainly from popular accounts of this field by the likes of Richard Dawkins and Carl Zimmer.

The Theory of Evolution

Even though I do not regret reading this book, I cannot really say I enjoyed the book, or that it was useful in understanding evolution better. Maynard Smith was a mathematician-turned-biologist and this is clear from his writing style. It is wri I decided to pick up and read John Maynard Smith's The Theory of Evolution to deepen my understanding of evultionary biology.

It is written in a rather dull and abstract way, which makes it hard to follow. Especially when dealing with the genetic underpinnings of evolution, Maynard Smith makes it harder than necessary for the reader to understand the topic. I have read more modern texts - preferably with pictures and diagrams - that are able to explain the exact same topic in a much more practical and concise way. For example, describing the different effects of homo- and heterozygosity on phenotypes with words is a rather convulated way - compared to, say, a diagram.

Anyway, even though the book didn't really offer me any new insights in evolutionary biology, it was a good refresher.

It helps to read different authors on the same topic; makes it easier to grasp the material in my experience. Evolution is a rather simple and beautiful idea: Genetic and environmental variations - during the development from fertilized egg to adult - lead to morphological and behavioural differences between individuals.

These differences in traits result in differences in fit between organism and environment. These differences in fitness result in differences in reproductive success. Hence, the environment selects, via the built phenotypes, the genotypes that are - comparatively speaking - the best ones available.

This leads, over geological time measured in millions of years , to the accumulation of changes, resulting in different species. This, in a nutshell, is evolution.

Maynard Smith emphasizes the relative rol of natural selection in evolution. He explains how fitness can account for only a small percentage of the selection going on - most of it is contingent for example unfortunate individuals dying having nothing to do with any fit whatsoever.

He also explains how evolution is continuously going on: Hence, evolution is undpredictable and can only be distilled with hindsight. A last important point is the infamous bottleneck in evolution.

All higher organisms have to go through an emryonic and youthful stage. This means that genetic changes have an effect on the development of organisms, and hence are 'constrained' by the body plan that they alter.

Natural selection has to 'work' with the minimum of variation that is available.

The man who struggled with his own ideas

This is an important point that Maynard Smith works out with great detail and in all its complexities for example, the existence of a minimum of variation in populations.

So, can I recommend this book? Not really, rather pick up a contemporary biology textbook and study the topics. Jul 31, Emelia rated it really liked it Overall, I enjoyed reading this book. I felt at times that I was lost to the point of the science being explained, but that could of been that there was no point, simply John Maynard Smith was enlightening me to something. In the end though, this is a good book to get a comprehensive view of evolution and it's mechanics.

Even if you are not into science and skip over the harder parts, you'll eventually be left with a nice understanding of evolution, genetics, speciation and the point of the most Overall, I enjoyed reading this book. Even if you are not into science and skip over the harder parts, you'll eventually be left with a nice understanding of evolution, genetics, speciation and the point of the most interesting discussion towards the end, the difference between evolutionary development and historical.

Makes you think.

My primary knowledge comes mainly from popular accounts of this field by the likes of Richard Dawkins and Carl Zimmer. Even though I do not regret reading this book, I cannot really say I enjoyed the book, or that it was useful in understanding evolution better.

Maynard Smith was a mathematician-turned-biologist and this is clear from his writing style. It is wri I decided to pick up and read John Maynard Smith's The Theory of Evolution to deepen my understanding of evultionary biology. It is written in a rather dull and abstract way, which makes it hard to follow. Especially when dealing with the genetic underpinnings of evolution, Maynard Smith makes it harder than necessary for the reader to understand the topic.

I have read more modern texts - preferably with pictures and diagrams - that are able to explain the exact same topic in a much more practical and concise way. For example, describing the different effects of homo- and heterozygosity on phenotypes with words is a rather convulated way - compared to, say, a diagram.

Anyway, even though the book didn't really offer me any new insights in evolutionary biology, it was a good refresher. It helps to read different authors on the same topic; makes it easier to grasp the material in my experience. Evolution is a rather simple and beautiful idea: genes build bodies, via long chains of proteins building proteins. Genetic and environmental variations - during the development from fertilized egg to adult - lead to morphological and behavioural differences between individuals.

These differences in traits result in differences in fit between organism and environment.In this way, natural selection guides the evolutionary process, preserving and adding up the beneficial mutations and rejecting the bad ones. Darwin concludes: He writes:.

She was able to write in an almost novelistic way, except this is fact and not fiction. Sort order. Page ii contains quotations by William Whewell and Francis Bacon on the theology of natural laws , [] harmonising science and religion in accordance with Isaac Newton 's belief in a rational God who established a law-abiding cosmos. Book sales increased from 60 to per month. Get the weekly Five Books newsletter.